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FAQs

What Sewa will do?

  • Enable potential donors to register online to donate.
  • Enable potential patients to seek donors in the registry.
  • Provide customer service to enable smooth communication.
  • Support families on both the donor’s and recipient’s side with information and resources.
  • Sewa will maintain the highest standards in client confidentiality.
  • Once a donor has been identified, Sewa will share that information with the doctors in the care team of a potential recipient.

What Sewa will not do?

  • Sewa will never share any personal information about donors or recipients with anyone other than doctors and care team involved in this process.
  • Sewa will avoid the collection of your medical records or private information over email or over the phone.
  • Sewa cannot guarantee the outcome of this entire exercise, whether a certain donation is successful or not, that depends completely on the suitability of the potential donors and on the discretion of the care team of physicians and specialists.

What is a coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses which may cause illness in animals or humans. In humans, several coronaviruses are known to cause respiratory infections ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). The most recently discovered coronavirus causes coronavirus disease COVID-19.

Source : https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses

What must I do after my patient(s) receive the plasma product?

After you administer the plasma product, you will need to complete several, short additional forms: a 4-hour post infusion data form capturing the essential data on serious adverse events that are required by the Sponsor and US Government; and two additional short, data forms at days 7 and 30 if your patient(s) remain hospitalized. It takes only a few minutes to complete each of the forms, which ensures that the expanded access program remains safe and potentially efficacious for all involved.

Source : https://www.uscovidplasma.org/faq.html

How long does the virus survive on surfaces?

It is not certain how long the virus that causes COVID-19 survives on surfaces, but it seems to behave like other coronaviruses. Studies suggest that coronaviruses (including preliminary information on the COVID-19 virus) may persist on surfaces for a few hours or up to several days. This may vary under different conditions (e.g. type of surface, temperature or humidity of the environment). If you think a surface may be infected, clean it with simple disinfectant to kill the virus and protect yourself and others. Clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Avoid touching your eyes, mouth, or nose.

Source : https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, tiredness, and dry cough. Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Some people become infected but don’t develop any symptoms and don't feel unwell. Most people (about 80%) recover from the disease without needing special treatment. Around 1 out of every 6 people who gets COVID-19 becomes seriously ill and develops difficulty breathing. Older people, and those with underlying medical problems like high blood pressure, heart problems or diabetes, are more likely to develop serious illness. People with fever, cough and difficulty breathing should seek medical attention.

Source : https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses

Is COVID-19 the same as SARS?

No. The virus that causes COVID-19 and the one that caused the outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) in 2003 are related to each other genetically, but the diseases they cause are quite different. SARS was more deadly but much less infectious than COVID-19. There have been no outbreaks of SARS anywhere in the world since 2003.

Source : https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses

How long is the incubation period for COVID-19?

The “incubation period” means the time between catching the virus and beginning to have symptoms of the disease. Most estimates of the incubation period for COVID-19 range from 1-14 days, most commonly around five days. These estimates will be updated as more data become available.

Source : https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses

Is COVID-19 airborne?

The virus that causes COVID-19 is mainly transmitted through droplets generated when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or speaks. These droplets are too heavy to hang in the air. They quickly fall on floors or surfaces. You can be infected by breathing in the virus if you are within 1 metre of a person who has COVID-19, or by touching a contaminated surface and then touching your eyes, nose or mouth before washing your hands.

Source : https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses

How did the first human SARS-CoV-2 infections occur?

The first human cases of COVID-19 were identified in Wuhan City, China in December 2019. At this stage, it is not possible to determine precisely how humans in China were initially infected with SARS-CoV-2. However, SARS-CoV, the virus which caused the SARS outbreak in 2003, jumped from an animal reservoir (civet cats, a farmed wild animal) to humans and then spread between humans. In a similar way, it is thought that SARS-CoV-2 jumped the species barrier and initially infected humans, but more likely through an intermediate host, that is another animal species more likely to be handled by humans - this could be a domestic animal, a wild animal, or a domesticated wild animal and, as of yet, has not been identified. Until the source of this virus is identified and controlled, there is a risk of reintroduction of the virus in the human population and the risk of new outbreaks like the ones we are currently experiencing.

Source : https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/q-a-coronaviruses

Information for Fully Recovered Coronavirus (COVID-19) Patients

Patients who have fully recovered following a COVID-19 diagnosis may have antibodies in their blood plasma that can help those with serious or immediately life-threatening COVID-19 infections.

Source : https://www.redcrossblood.org/donate-blood/dlp/coronavirus--covid-19--and-blood-donation.html

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